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Marie Antoinette's Watch by John Biggs

Marie Antoinette’s Watch

by John Biggs

Giveaway ends May 15, 2015.

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Pre-order My New Book, Technotopia

Pre-order My New Book, Technotopia

We’ve all been expecting a techno dystopia, a world shattered by climate change and deadened by social media. But what if the reverse is true? Technotopia is a book about the future and how things will get better, not worse, in the next 100 years.

I’m John Biggs and I’ve been a professional cynic for the past decade. I saw where technology was headed and I was upset, not amazed. But something is changing and I want to tell you about it.

“Yearly reminder: unless you’re over 60, you weren’t promised flying cars. You were promised an oppressive cyberpunk dystopia. Here you go,” wrote Kyle Marquis in February 2015. For most of my life Marquis’ words rang true. I saw the future as a slide into darkness, all Blade Runner and dirty bombs. But we are living in an era of unprecedented access to information and increasingly improved access to the resources needed to build a better world. All is not peaches and cream – yet – but I argue it will get there.

Excerpt from The Smoke

Excerpt from The Smoke

Here’s something I’m working on right now. Thoughts?

The smoke came at night and left by morning. Sectors of the city were covered by it and the people that lived there and who did not escape as soon as the first licks of smoke snuffled at their doors, those too sick to move or too old or those who had given up, stayed in it. Lights flashed in there, people said, and under the fog horns people said they heard a crunching like a dog at a bone. By morning that sector had been changed. Sometimes they were crowded with new buildings, sometimes the previous buildings were destroyed and the ground left flat and shiny as ice. Some days all that was left was a white marble temple to a forgotten god. The people that stayed were gone.

Dad’s Garage

Dad’s Garage

If you needed a hammer or a saw or a roll of red caps or a broken broom handle or a nest of telephone wire or a anti-seize paste or anything you could ever imagine you could find it out in Dad’s garage. The core of the garage was a beautiful old work bench, so dark and scarred that it looked medieval. There was an iron vise bolted to it and jar after jar of screws, nails, and nuts arrayed along the back edge. An old radio, tuned forever to the local NPR station, would crackle on and and stay on while you worked out there. If you needed a tire iron or a jack or a bucket for used motor oil or a length of tubing to start work you’d dig around that bench and risk jostling that radio until you pulled it out, a prize that came at just the beginning of the race.

How Writers Should Use Email Marketing

How Writers Should Use Email Marketing

I was talking with my buddy John Sundman about email and social media and email. He, like me, found that Facebook was useless as a sales medium and Twitter was worse than useless. I’ve had plenty of retweets from folks with more than a million followers and the sales results have been abysmal. In fact, the only surefire way of selling a book is via email. End of story.

John asked me a few questions: “How many people get it? What kind of response do you get when you send out a blast? What mailer tool do you use? How did you build up your mailing list? How long did that take?”